Various Grammar Things (Diagramming Compound Sentences and Word Usage)

We talked about usage errors associated with adjectives and adverbs today.
Good vs. Well – Good is an adjective. She is a good bowler. Well describes can be used as an adverb or an adjective (when used to describe health). She bowls well.
Bad vs. Badly – Bad is an adjective. She is a bad bowler. Badly is an adverb. She bowls badly.

Modifying Adjectives and Adverbs
Most adjectives can be modified by an adverb; most adverbs can be modified by other adverbs.
You cannot modify words that are already at their most intense, such as “favorite” or “unique”. For example, it is incorrect to say that you are somebody’s “most favorite” person, or that you are “incredibly unique”.

Compound Sentence Structures . . . OF DOOM!

Clause – a grammatical structure containing a subject and verb and expressing a complete idea. They can be divided into two groups:

  • Independent: a grammatical structure containing a subject and verb and expressing a complete idea. An independent clause is a sentence.
  • Dependent: A grammatical structure containing a subject and a very but not expressing a complete idea.

Diagramming
Mr. Brown and his son own a bookstore.
compdiagram
“And” always goes on the left side of the dotted line. ALWAYS.

Compound sentence – two or more independent clauses joined by a coordinating conjunction by a semicolon, or by a semicolon and a conjunctive adverb. You already know FANBOYS. “For” can be a preposition as well. It serves as a coordinating conjunction when it joins two independent clauses and means “because”.
ex. The Wife of Bath is a fascinating character, for she is not the typical medieval woman.
“SO” IS NOT AN INTENSIFIER. “So” means “therefore”.

A compound sentence joined by a coordinating conjunction almost always needs a comma before the coordinating conjunction. The comma should be omitted only if both independent clauses are extremely short and the comma would unnecessarily slow down the flow of the sentence.
Another way to construct a compound sentence is simply to place a semicolon between two independent clauses. Chaucer’s Knight tells the first tale’ it is a lengthy, slow-paced romance. More often than not, the semicolon that joins two independent clauses is followed by a conjunctive adverb. Almost always, the conjunctive adverb is followed by a comma.
More diagramming here.
The Miller is intoxicated, so he tells a bawdy tale.
compdiagram2

Advertisements

3 Responses to “Various Grammar Things (Diagramming Compound Sentences and Word Usage)”

  1. i think you left out “his” on the first diagram.. Which modifies son

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: